Year of Publication

1994

Paper Type

Master's Thesis

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Degree Name

Master of Science in Mathematical Sciences (MS)

Department

Mathematics & Statistics

First Advisor

Dr. Pali Sen

Second Advisor

Dr. Donna Mohr

Third Advisor

Dr. Adel Boules

Abstract

Infant mortality is a public health concern in the United states. We concentrate on neonatal mortality for its high accountability of infant mortality. In this paper we study the neonatal mortality of Florida's 1989 live birth cohort.

The data has been analyzed for two major causes of deaths: perinatal conditions and congenital anomalies. We use the KAPLAN-MEIER method to estimate the survival probabilities. For each cause, data were fit to the Weibull models and Extreme Value models to estimate the parameters of the survival curves. The results indicate that primary factors for each cause of neonatal deaths are very low birth weight, prior pregnancies of the mother, and late initiation of prenatal care when the variables are considered separately. The conclusion still remains the same for perinatal conditions when the interaction effects of the factors are considered, but we do not conclude similarly for the congenital anomalies at the same interaction level.

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Mathematics Commons

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