Year of Publication

1995

Paper Type

Doctoral Dissertation

College

College of Education and Human Services

Degree Name

Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership (EdD)

Department

Education

First Advisor

Dr. Kenneth T. Wilburn

Second Advisor

Dr. Lane Wallace

Third Advisor

Dr. Janet Bosnick

Fourth Advisor

Dr. Robert Drummond

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the use of microcomputers by principals in their roles as instructional leaders and managers, and its impact upon the use of microcomputer technology in the school. The research was done by having the randomly stratified selected sample population respond to a survey. The subjects of this study were elementary, middle/junior and high school principals in the Florida Public School System.

Of the responding principals 82.8% reported having access to a microcomputer in their office at school. One-third of the principals reported not having a microcomputer in their own homes. Word processing was reported as the most used application program and spread sheet applications the least used. Principals reported using the microcomputer in managerial tasks such as attendance, discipline, scheduling and grade reporting.

The data indicated principals have not taken a proactive stance in their own personal learning about microcomputers and how they can be used. Responding principals, for the most part, did not perceive of the teachers within the building they work as using the microcomputer for the managerial functions of teaching.

Presently principals are not taking full advantage of the microcomputer as a tool that can help them in their roles as instructional leaders and managers. Principals must also become more actively involved in the decision making process of the various technologies in which their school can participate.

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