Year of Publication

1995

Paper Type

Doctoral Dissertation

College

College of Education and Human Services

Degree Name

Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership (EdD)

Department

Education

First Advisor

Dr. Kenneth T. Wilburn

Second Advisor

Dr. Robert Drummond

Third Advisor

Dr. Layne Wallace

Fourth Advisor

Dr. Thomas Serwatka

Department Chair

Dr. John Venn

College Dean

Dr. Katherine Kasten

Abstract

This study investigated the learning style, teaching style, and attitude toward change of elementary school teachers and the relationship of these variables to the adoption of computer technology into teaching and learning strategies. The researcher used four instruments to gather data about the preferred learning style, teaching style, attitude toward change, and current utilization of computer technology both personally and with students.

Survey forms were delivered to seven selected elementary schools in a Northeast Florida public school district. An educational technology survey was distributed to each of the 200 elementary school teachers in these schools. The return rate of completed surveys was approximately 36% (N=73). In addition, those teachers in each school who elected to participate in this study completed one of the following instruments: the Teaching Style Inventory, the Change Seeker Index, or the Learning Type Measure .

Statistical analyses were conducted to determine if there were any significant relationships among the three factors (teaching style, learning style, and attitude toward change) and the adoption of computer technology by the teachers in this study. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the length of computer use and the location of computer use by the participants as well as other demographic variables.

The major findings of the study were: (1) The highest instructional use of the computer by teachers was drill and practice. (2) Teachers were using the computer sparingly. The usage of the computer with their students ranged from once-a-year usage to daily usage. The most frequently reported usage was drill and practice on a daily basis. (3) No significant relationships between the preferred learning style and the adoption of computer technology were evident. ( 4) No significant relationships between the teaching style of the participants in this study and the adoption of computer technology were identified. (5) The relationship between the intrinsic factors and the adoption of computer technology was not significant. The relationship between the extrinsic factors and the adoption of computer technology was significant at the p

Recommendations related to preservice teacher education, inservice training, and promoting the adoption of technology were made. Also, recommendations were made regarding future investigations that examine the relationship of learning style, teaching style, attitude toward change, and the adoption of computer technology by school teachers.

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