Year of Publication

1987

Paper Type

Master's Thesis

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Degree Name

Master of Science in Criminal Justice (MSCJ)

Department

Criminology & Criminal Justice

Abstract

Research was completed on a 300-person sample of 1985 arrestees in Jacksonville, Florida. The original focus of the study was to explore the possible relationship between crime and chemical use. Data was obtained from forms that were routinely used in the jail booking and interview process. Two booking/intake forms were used: The Arrest and Booking Report and the Medical Screening Information (P-075) form. Only 24 arrestees in the 300-person sample admitted to using chemicals. Hence, the data did not support the hypothesis of this thesis that a correlational relationship exists between crime and chemical use. This researcher observed and interviewed medical personnel closely and reviewed both forms used in the study to determine why chemical use data was under-represented in the sample. Organizational and individual deviance by the medical staff was discovered. The nurses had not asked chemical use questions during a majority of the medical screening interviews.

Included in

Criminology Commons

Share

COinS