Year of Publication

1997

Paper Type

Master's Thesis

College

Brooks College of Health

Degree Name

Master of Science in Health Administration (MHA)

First Advisor

Larry Jean, Ed.D.

Second Advisor

Nick Wilson, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Dan Whitehead, M.H.A.

Abstract

This is a study of the relationship between consumer credit scoring and the resolution of a patient's account for hospital services. Accounts studied were classified as Good accounts or Bad accounts based upon their final resolution. Bad accounts were those written-off to bad debt with Good accounts being all others.

The probability of predicting a patient's account being either Good or Bad was based upon a consumer credit scoring process. The null hypothesis of this study was that the consumer credit scoring process would not provide any indication about the outcome or resolution of the account. Analysis of the credit score and the outcome of the hospital account suggested the consumer credit score would indicate the patient's reliability in taking responsibility for the account. Based on the confidence given to credit scoring in consumer markets and the results of this study, the consumer credit score would have value for the health care industry.

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