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Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Kristen Hicks-Roof

Faculty Sponsor College

Brooks College of Health

Faculty Sponsor Department

Nutrition & Dietetics

Location

SOARS Virtual Conference

Presentation Website

https://unfsoars.domains.unf.edu/pilot-study-can-college-students-recognize-whole-grains-when-immersed-in-virtual-reality/

Keywords

SOARS (Conference) (2020 : University of North Florida) -- Posters; University of North Florida. Office of Undergraduate Research; University of North Florida. Graduate School; College students – Research -- Florida – Jacksonville -- Posters; University of North Florida – Undergraduates -- Research -- Posters; University of North Florida. Department of Nutrition and Dietetics -- Research -- Posters; Health Sciences -- Research – Posters

Abstract

Background: Knowledge and consumption of a variety of whole grains are limited in the college-age population. Immersion into virtual reality simulates one being transported from their current surroundings to a completely new atmosphere.

Methods: A pilot study was conducted to determine if college students would be able to correctly identify various grains while immersed in virtual reality. Participants (n=39) were asked to sample two similarly shaped grains (pearl couscous and whole grain sorghum) while immersed in a virtual reality on-campus cafe. Participant surveys captured demographics, a sensory analysis on grains tasted, history of grain consumption and grain nutrition knowledge.

Results: Participants (females=34, males=5) were mostly juniors (72%). Common grains the participants had previously been exposed to were, oats (97%), white rice (94%), brown rice (92%), quinoa (92%), wheat (82%), and couscous (69%). The least common grains participants had previously been exposed to were, sorghum (15%), spelt (0.7%), kamut (0.5%), teff (0.5%), amaranth (0.2%), and triticale (0%). Only 28% correctly selected at least one of the samples, and only 0.05% selected both correct samples. Only 44% of participants could correctly identify that the USDA Dietary Guidelines recommends making half of all grains consumed be whole grains.

Conclusions: This preliminary data shows that our participants are mostly exposed to common whole grains, and their perception of food samples can be obstructed while being in a virtual reality setting. Whole grain knowledge and exposure is limited and should be increased in this subgroup.

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Apr 8th, 12:00 AM Apr 8th, 12:00 AM

Pilot Study: Can College Students Recognize Whole Grains When Immersed in Virtual Reality

SOARS Virtual Conference

Background: Knowledge and consumption of a variety of whole grains are limited in the college-age population. Immersion into virtual reality simulates one being transported from their current surroundings to a completely new atmosphere.

Methods: A pilot study was conducted to determine if college students would be able to correctly identify various grains while immersed in virtual reality. Participants (n=39) were asked to sample two similarly shaped grains (pearl couscous and whole grain sorghum) while immersed in a virtual reality on-campus cafe. Participant surveys captured demographics, a sensory analysis on grains tasted, history of grain consumption and grain nutrition knowledge.

Results: Participants (females=34, males=5) were mostly juniors (72%). Common grains the participants had previously been exposed to were, oats (97%), white rice (94%), brown rice (92%), quinoa (92%), wheat (82%), and couscous (69%). The least common grains participants had previously been exposed to were, sorghum (15%), spelt (0.7%), kamut (0.5%), teff (0.5%), amaranth (0.2%), and triticale (0%). Only 28% correctly selected at least one of the samples, and only 0.05% selected both correct samples. Only 44% of participants could correctly identify that the USDA Dietary Guidelines recommends making half of all grains consumed be whole grains.

Conclusions: This preliminary data shows that our participants are mostly exposed to common whole grains, and their perception of food samples can be obstructed while being in a virtual reality setting. Whole grain knowledge and exposure is limited and should be increased in this subgroup.

https://digitalcommons.unf.edu/soars/2020/spring_2020/96