Presentation Title

Why Are You So Slimy?

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Laura Habegger

Faculty Sponsor College

College of Arts and Sciences

Faculty Sponsor Department

Biology

Location

SOARS Virtual Conference

Presentation Website

https://unfsoars.domains.unf.edu/2021/posters/why-are-you-so-slimy/

Keywords

SOARS (Conference) (2021 : University of North Florida) – Archives; SOARS (Conference) (2021 : University of North Florida) – Posters; University of North Florida -- Students -- Research – Posters; University of North Florida. Office of Undergraduate Research; University of North Florida. Graduate School; College students – Research -- Florida – Jacksonville – Posters; University of North Florida – Undergraduates -- Research – Posters; University of North Florida. Department of Biology -- Research -- Posters

Abstract

The epithelium of vertebrates is a complex tissue that houses a large variety of cells with different functions. One of its most important functions is protection and in many cases this function is achieved by exuding copious amounts of mucous that fight off diseases, harmful toxins and overall protect the species from external invaders. Mucous, made of mucin, is produced by specialized epithelial cells called goblet cells. Among vertebrates’, fishes are perhaps one of the major groups known to produce mucous, particularly stingrays. The Atlantic stingray, Dasyatis sabina is one of the few cartilaginous fishes known to inhabit both freshwater areas and saltwater areas. It has been suggested by that mucous production varies significantly among freshwater and saltwater populations. In this study we aim to characterize the epithelium of freshwater vs saltwater D. sabina by quantifying (if any) variations on goblet cells density among different populations (freshwater vs salt water). This study will contribute to a much-needed characterization of stingray epithelia that may be used as a baseline anatomical framework in future studies and will contribute to the limited epithelium related literature among lower vertebrates. In addition, this study will contribute to our understanding of the morphological bases for the differential mucous production among this populations to ultimately relate this to ecosystem differences and environmental issues including water pollution.

Rights Statement

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/

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Apr 7th, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Why Are You So Slimy?

SOARS Virtual Conference

The epithelium of vertebrates is a complex tissue that houses a large variety of cells with different functions. One of its most important functions is protection and in many cases this function is achieved by exuding copious amounts of mucous that fight off diseases, harmful toxins and overall protect the species from external invaders. Mucous, made of mucin, is produced by specialized epithelial cells called goblet cells. Among vertebrates’, fishes are perhaps one of the major groups known to produce mucous, particularly stingrays. The Atlantic stingray, Dasyatis sabina is one of the few cartilaginous fishes known to inhabit both freshwater areas and saltwater areas. It has been suggested by that mucous production varies significantly among freshwater and saltwater populations. In this study we aim to characterize the epithelium of freshwater vs saltwater D. sabina by quantifying (if any) variations on goblet cells density among different populations (freshwater vs salt water). This study will contribute to a much-needed characterization of stingray epithelia that may be used as a baseline anatomical framework in future studies and will contribute to the limited epithelium related literature among lower vertebrates. In addition, this study will contribute to our understanding of the morphological bases for the differential mucous production among this populations to ultimately relate this to ecosystem differences and environmental issues including water pollution.

https://digitalcommons.unf.edu/soars/2021/spring_2021/13

 

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