Presenter Information

Maria Encinosa

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Anne Pfister

Faculty Sponsor College

College of Arts and Sciences

Faculty Sponsor Department

Sociology and Anthropology

Location

SOARS Virtual Conference

Presentation Website

https://unfsoars.domains.unf.edu/2021/posters/embodied-injustices-covid-19-race-and-epigenetics/

Keywords

SOARS (Conference) (2021 : University of North Florida) – Archives; SOARS (Conference) (2021 : University of North Florida) – Posters; University of North Florida -- Students -- Research – Posters; University of North Florida. Office of Undergraduate Research; University of North Florida. Graduate School; College students – Research -- Florida – Jacksonville – Posters; University of North Florida – Undergraduates -- Research – Posters; University of North Florida. Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work -- Research – Posters; Project of Merit Award Winner; Digital Projects Showcase Exhibitor Award

Abstract

Digital Projects Showcase Exhibitor Award Although historical and even modern accounts of race assume significant biological differences between racial groups, race has little biological meaning. Nonetheless, the social construct of race has real consequences. Racial identity defines boundaries of community and impacts the experiences of individuals, including how people live and die during a pandemic. COVID-19 has disproportionately affected minority communities in the United States, triggering many explanations for racial disparities in health. Through an analysis of sources spanning from popular media to traditional academic journals, I analyze the potential for epigenetic research to serve as a missing link that operationalizes the embodiment of racialized social experiences as comorbidities that enhance vulnerability to COVID-19. The theory of embodiment describes how our material and social worlds become embodied aspects of our biology. Epigenetic modifications, which affect gene expression without changing the nucleotide sequence of DNA, exemplify the body’s porousness to the external environment as they can be triggered by environmental stressors. Minority populations are more likely to be subject to environments characterized by exposures ranging from residential pollution to malnutrition. In turn, these stimuli are linked to stress, metabolic, and respiratory disorders which increase COVID-19 susceptibility.

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Rights Statement

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/

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Apr 7th, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Embodied Injustices: COVID-19, Race, and Epigenetics

SOARS Virtual Conference

Digital Projects Showcase Exhibitor Award Although historical and even modern accounts of race assume significant biological differences between racial groups, race has little biological meaning. Nonetheless, the social construct of race has real consequences. Racial identity defines boundaries of community and impacts the experiences of individuals, including how people live and die during a pandemic. COVID-19 has disproportionately affected minority communities in the United States, triggering many explanations for racial disparities in health. Through an analysis of sources spanning from popular media to traditional academic journals, I analyze the potential for epigenetic research to serve as a missing link that operationalizes the embodiment of racialized social experiences as comorbidities that enhance vulnerability to COVID-19. The theory of embodiment describes how our material and social worlds become embodied aspects of our biology. Epigenetic modifications, which affect gene expression without changing the nucleotide sequence of DNA, exemplify the body’s porousness to the external environment as they can be triggered by environmental stressors. Minority populations are more likely to be subject to environments characterized by exposures ranging from residential pollution to malnutrition. In turn, these stimuli are linked to stress, metabolic, and respiratory disorders which increase COVID-19 susceptibility.

https://digitalcommons.unf.edu/soars/2021/spring_2021/33

 

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