Presenter Information

Hannah Merritt
Gordon Rakita

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Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Gordon Rakita

Faculty Sponsor College

College of Arts and Sciences

Faculty Sponsor Department

Sociology and Anthropology

Location

SOARS Virtual Conference

Presentation Website

https://unfsoars.domains.unf.edu/2021/posters/dental-disparities-a-quantitative-regional-analysis-of-male-oral-health-in-the-united-states/

Keywords

SOARS (Conference) (2021 : University of North Florida) – Archives; SOARS (Conference) (2021 : University of North Florida) – Posters; University of North Florida -- Students -- Research – Posters; University of North Florida. Office of Undergraduate Research; University of North Florida. Graduate School; College students – Research -- Florida – Jacksonville – Posters; University of North Florida – Undergraduates -- Research – Posters; University of North Florida. Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work -- Research – Posters; Project of Merit Award Winner

Abstract

Project of Merit Winner

Multiple factors contribute to the oral health of male individuals in the United States, including economic, regional, and gender disparities. My study compares health care coverage and poverty rates to indicators of oral health status and dental care access such as percentage of tooth lost, number of dental visits, and oral health services at federally qualified health centers. This oral health data is drawn from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention across all fifty states in the year 2018 and from the United States Census. By examining this data, I will be able to answer the questions is there a correlation between poverty per capita and oral health care across the fifty states among males and if so why, is there a correlation between health insurance coverage per capita and oral health care across the fifty states among males and if so why, and lastly, is there a difference of correlation between men and women oral health in the fifty states. Through quantitative correlation assessments I will be able to reveal results about the accessibility and regional disparities of oral health care in the U.S. Population. This study also allows for further evaluation of an underrepresented aspect of healthcare in the United States.

Comments

Audio Presentation Transcript:

Multiple factors contribute to the oral health of male individuals in the United States, including economic, regional, and gender disparities. My study compares health care coverage and poverty rates to indicators of oral health status and dental care access such as percentage of tooth lost, number of dental visits, and oral health services at federally qualified health centers. This oral health data is drawn from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention across all fifty states in the year 2018 and from the United States Census. By examining this data, I will be able to answer the questions is there a correlation between poverty per capita and oral health care across the fifty states among males and if so why, is there a correlation between health insurance coverage per capita and oral health care across the fifty states among males and if so why, and lastly, is there a difference of correlation between men and women oral health in the fifty states. Through quantitative correlation assessments I will be able to reveal results about the accessibility and regional disparities of oral health care in the U.S. Population. This study also allows for further evaluation of an underrepresented aspect of healthcare in the United States. I completed the Shaperio Wilks Normality Assessment on all data variables before proceeding to complete Pearson and Spearmen correlation assessments. All statistical tests revealed significant correlation; therefore, I reject all my null hypotheses in favor of the alternative. Socio-economic factors seem to be the causation of poor oral health in the United States, and despite the stigma that men have poorer overall health than women, there was no major difference in correlations. This allows us to conclude that it is not gender disparities that causes poor oral health, rather economic burdens. By defining regionality we can identify areas in need of additional health care. Oral health has been swept under the rug and deemed as not important in the eyes of the medical and political community. Ignoring dental care has only created regional disparities, however through communication, outreach, and education we can lessen these discrepancies.

Rights Statement

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/

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Apr 7th, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Dental Disparities: A Quantitative & Regional Analysis of Male Oral Health in the United States

SOARS Virtual Conference

Project of Merit Winner

Multiple factors contribute to the oral health of male individuals in the United States, including economic, regional, and gender disparities. My study compares health care coverage and poverty rates to indicators of oral health status and dental care access such as percentage of tooth lost, number of dental visits, and oral health services at federally qualified health centers. This oral health data is drawn from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention across all fifty states in the year 2018 and from the United States Census. By examining this data, I will be able to answer the questions is there a correlation between poverty per capita and oral health care across the fifty states among males and if so why, is there a correlation between health insurance coverage per capita and oral health care across the fifty states among males and if so why, and lastly, is there a difference of correlation between men and women oral health in the fifty states. Through quantitative correlation assessments I will be able to reveal results about the accessibility and regional disparities of oral health care in the U.S. Population. This study also allows for further evaluation of an underrepresented aspect of healthcare in the United States.

https://digitalcommons.unf.edu/soars/2021/spring_2021/82

 

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