Year of Publication

1983

Paper Type

Master's Thesis

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Degree Name

Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology (MACP)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. L.A. Foley

Second Advisor

Dr. Rick Powell

Department Chair

Dr. L.A. Foley

Abstract

Male mortality rates exceeded female rates in every death type and the sex differential increased from 1970 to 1980 in every death type except homicides. The findings in this study suggest that marital and employment factors contribute to sex differences in mortality for suicidal and accidental deaths. Being employed was associated with fewer suicidal and accidental deaths for females than for males. Being married was associated with fewer suicidal and accidental deaths for males, while marital status had no relationship to suicidal and accidental deaths for females. Due to these relationships it might be inferred that the expanding sex differential in suicidal and accidental mortality rates is associated with the spiraling divorce rate and the dramatic increase in female employment. Results relative to homicidal deaths appear ambiguous and do not offer support for the hypothesis that marital and employment factors contribute to the observed sex differences in homicidal death rates.

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