Year of Publication

2014

Season of Publication

Spring

Paper Type

Doctoral Project

College

Brooks College of Health

Degree Name

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)

Department

Nursing

NACO controlled Corporate Body

University of North Florida. School of Nursing

First Advisor

Dr. Barbara Kruger

Second Advisor

Dr. Carol Ledbetter

Third Advisor

Dr. Jan Meires

Department Chair

Dr. Lillia Loriz

College Dean

Dr. Pamela Chally

Abstract

The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational lifestyle modification (LM) intervention on blood pressure (BP) among adults with prehypertension. Prehypertension is a precursor to hypertension (HTN) and is a public epidemic in the United States. Approximately 68 million (31%) U.S. adult’s aged ≥18 years have hypertension. Hypertension can cause significant target organ damage, lead to coronary heart disease, heart failure, stroke, and kidney failure. Early identification and the primary treatment of persons with prehypertension with LM have the potential to minimize the progression and delay the onset of comorbidities associated with hypertension. This quality improvement project retrospectively reviewed changes in blood pressure for a small sample (n=5) of patients diagnosed with prehypertension who received education about modifying lifestyle behaviors according to nationally accepted clinical practice guidelines. Blood pressure measurements were extracted from the medical record beginning at the time of the education through a three month period. Descriptive data indicates that all five patients had a decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The median systolic blood pressure at baseline was 129 mmHg decreasing to 121 mmHg at end of study period. The median diastolic blood pressure was 86 mmHg decreasing to 76 mmHg. Integration of lifestyle modification education and subsequent blood pressure monitoring during a routine primary care visit is feasible and may help motivate patients to implement changes and subsequently reduce blood pressure. Future studies should include identifying strategies for improving patient participation.

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