Title

Hospital Geographic Location and Unexpected Complications in term Newborns in Florida

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-1-2022

Subject Area

Female; Florida (epidemiology); Hospitals, Rural; Hospitals, Urban; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Longitudinal Studies; Retrospective Studies; United States (epidemiology)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Birth trauma rates in term of neonates is a quality measure used by the Joint Commission. In the United States birth trauma rates occurs at a rate of 37 per 1000 live births and are on the decline. However, this decline has been significantly lower among term neonates born in rural facilities. There is a critical lack of evidence toward the influence geographical risk factors has on birth trauma rates for neonatal patients. We sought to measure rural community and hospital characteristics associated with birth trauma. METHODS: A retrospective longitudinal study design was used to examine inpatient medical discharge data across 103 hospitals of neonates at birth from 2013 to 2018. Discharge data was linked to the American Hospital Association annual survey. We used a multi-level mixed effect model to investigate the relationship between individual and hospital-level attributes associated with increased risk of birth trauma among neonatal patients. RESULTS: We found that rural hospitals were 3.99 times (p < 0.001) more likely to experience higher birth trauma than urban hospitals. Medium sized hospitals were 2.11 times (p < 0.001) more likely to experience higher birth trauma. Hospitals who indicate having a safety culture were more likely (p < 0.05) to have high rates of birth trauma. DISCUSSION: Neonates born at rural hospitals, were more likely to experience a birth-related injury. Policy strategies focusing on improving health care quality in rural areas are critical to mitigating this increased risk of birth trauma. Further research is required to assess how physician characteristics may impact birth trauma rates.

Publication Title

Maternal and child health journal

Volume

26

Issue

2

First Page

358

Last Page

366

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1007/s10995-021-03240-1

PubMed ID

34613554

E-ISSN

1573-6628

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