Title

The self-control consequences of political ideology

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

7-7-2015

Abstract

Evidence from three studies reveals a critical difference in self-control as a function of political ideology. Specifically, greater endorsement of political conservatism (versus liberalism) was associated with greater attention regulation and task persistence. Moreover, this relationship is shown to stem from varying beliefs in freewill; specifically, the association between political ideology and selfcontrol is mediated by differences in the extent to which belief in freewill is endorsed, is independent of task performance or motivation, and is reversed when freewill is perceived to impede (rather than enhance) self-control. Collectively, these findings offer insight into the self-control consequences of political ideology by detailing conditions under which conservatives and liberals are better suited to engage in self-control and outlining the role of freewill beliefs in determining these conditions.

Publication Title

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Volume

112

Issue

27

First Page

8250

Last Page

8253

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1073/pnas.1503530112

PubMed ID

26100890

ISSN

00278424

E-ISSN

10916490

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