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Co-Editors

Len Roberson, Ph.D.; SC:L, CI, CT, University of North Florida

Len Roberson has been involved in the fields of deaf education and interpreting for 23 years. He is an active researcher, interpreter, and interpreter educator and holds the SC:L, CI and CT certifications from RID. Dr. Roberson is currently the Dean of the Graduate School at the University of North Florida and Assistant Vice-President of Academic Technology and is a tenured Associate professor currently teaching in the ASL/English Interpreting graduate program – a program he developed and founded at UNF. Since joining UNF in 1998, Dr. Roberson has received more than 3 million dollars in external funding as the principal investigator for numerous grants. His current research interests include the study of interpreting in legal settings, teacher effectiveness and preparation and service learning in interpreter education. Dr. Roberson has presented numerous papers and workshops in North America and abroad. He is co-owner of an interpreting agency in NE Florida through which he interprets primarily in legal settings. Dr. Roberson resides in Jacksonville, Florida with his beautiful wife and has seven beautiful children, 4 girls and 3 boys.

Sherry Shaw, Ed.D.; CSC, University of North Florida

Sherry Shaw has been an interpreter educator for 23 years and is Associate Professor and Program Director for the bachelor’s and master’s degree options in ASL/English Interpreting at the University of North Florida. She came to UNF from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock where she taught in the Interpreter Education Program for 18 years and was Program Director for three years. Dr. Shaw graduated from the University of Memphis in 2001, with a doctorate in Instruction and Curriculum Leadership with a concentration in Deaf-Blindness. In 2007, she came to UNF to start the “2 + 2” BS degree in collaboration with Florida State College at Jacksonville. In 2009, she implemented a M.Ed. concentration that is delivered via distance technology. Her research on interpreting student cognitive and motivational characteristics is ongoing and the most recent study measured spoken and signed language students’ cognitive flexibility, visual and verbal memory, attention shift, and processing speed. Additional research interests include community-based learning in interpreter education, social connectedness of Deaf children and senior citizens, interpreting student aptitude, and evidence-based admission testing.

Editorial Board

Dr. Glenn Anderson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Glenn Anderson, a native of Chicago, IL, earned his Ph.D. from New York University in 1982. An alumnus of Gallaudet University, he also earned his Master’s degree from the University of Arizona. He is a faculty member in the Interpreter Education Program at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR).

Prior to joining the UALR faculty, he served as Director of Training at the University of Arkansas Rehabilitation Research and Training Center for Persons who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing located in Little Rock. He was also Professor and coordinator of the University of Arkansas M.S. degree program in Rehabilitation Counseling with Persons who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. He has previously served as chair of the Gallaudet University Board of Trustees, second vice-chair of the National Council on Disability (NCD), and Board of Directors of National Black Deaf Advocates.

Dr. Carolyn Ball, CI, CT, Sorenson VRS Interpreter Institute

Carolyn Ballis currently the Executive Director of the VRS Interpreting Institute (VRSII) in Salt Lake City, Utah. Carolyn has been an interpreter educator with over twenty five years of experience in teaching, curriculum and administration in higher education. In addition to her administrative role at the VRSII, Carolyn continues to teach, practice as an interpreter and is active as a researcher with a specific interest in the history of the interpreting and interpreter education. Dr. Ball is also a commissioner with the Commission on Collegiate Interpreter Education (CCIE).

Dr. Karen Bontempo, PhD Macquarie University, Australia

Karen Bontempo has 23 years experience as an Auslan (Australian Sign Language) interpreter and has worked as an interpreter educator for the past 17 years. Her academic qualifications span the disciplines of psychology, linguistics and education. Karen holds a PhD (Linguistics) from Macquarie University, where she is an Honorary Associate of the Linguistics Dept. In addition, Karen works part time as a teacher at Shenton College Deaf Education Centre in Western Australia, specialising in LOTE (Language other than English) and ESL (English as a Second Language) teaching. She is also a part time lecturer at the Central Institute of Technology, where she teaches on the local interpreter education program. Karen is the national chairperson of the Interpreter Trainers’ Network in Australia; serves on the national interpreter's examination panel; and has published several journal articles and book chapters regarding her research interests in aptitude for interpreting, evaluation of interpreter performance, mentoring, and interpreting pedagogy.

Mr. Robert G. Lee, MA, CI/CT, University of Central Lancashire

Robert G. Lee has been interpreting, teaching and researching for over 25 years. A long-time member of RID, he is also a member of the Association of Sign Language Interpreters (UK) as well as the European Forum of Sign Language Interpreters. Robert has authored or co-authored numerous articles and chapters on Interpreting and Linguistics as well as presenting workshops in the USA, Europe and South America. He is currently Senior Lecturer in Deaf Studies at the University of Central Lancashire (UK) where he is the Course Leader for the MA and Postgraduate Diploma in Interpreting. He is currently co-editing a volume on Mentoring with Betsy Winston for RID as well as co-authoring a book on the role of interpreters in interactions (with Peter Llewellyn-Jones).

Dr. Carol J. Patrie, SC:L, CSC, CI, CT

Carol Patrie was one of the first educational interpreters at NTID when it opened. It was an exciting start to a fascinating career. She holds a CSC, SC:L, CI and CT from RID. After moving to Washington, DC she completed a Master's Degree at Catholic University and began freelance interpreting in a wide variety of settings, specializing in legal and medical interpreting. In 1984 accepted a faculty position at Gallaudet University. She completed her PhD at the University of Maryland.

She is currently a national and international consultant on interpretation and teaching interpretation and owns her own consulting business, Effective Interpreting, Inc. She is Director of Curriculum and Instruction for The Effective Interpreting Professional Education Series, Language Matters, Inc. She serves on the editorial boards of the International Journal of Interpreter Education and The Journal of Interpretation. She is a past president of the Conference of Interpreter Trainers and is a recipient of the Mary Stotler Award. She is a recipient of the Outstanding Graduate Faculty award at Gallaudet University where she was professor and director of the MA in Interpretation.

Patrie is the author of the seven-volume series, The Effective Interpreting Series and the video series, Interpreting in Medical, Legal, and Insurance Settings, all published by DawnSignPress. Her most recent release is The Effective Interpreting Series: Cognitive Processing in ASL. She is currently developing a multi-media package focusing on fingerspelled word recognition as well as the 8th volume in the EIS, Translating from ASL, both of which will be released in 2012. When she is not working on writing books, traveling, or teaching, she enjoys working in her glass studio and her garden.

Dr. Deb Russell, COI, University of Alberta

Deb Russell is an ASL-English interpreter, interpreter Educator, and Director of the Western Canadian Centre of Deaf Studies at the University of Alberta, Canada. She current holds the David Peikoff Chair of Deaf Studies. Her interpreting practice spans over thirty years and continues to be community based across a range of settings. Dr. Russell received her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from the University of Calgary and a Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the University of Alberta. She was a founding member of the Association of Visual Language Interpreters of Canada (AVLIC) and has served in a variety of leadership roles over the organization’s history. In addition to her teaching responsibilities, she maintains an active research program, with current projects that focus on interpreting in educational contexts, Deaf interpreters, and legal interpreting.

Dr. Russell is recognized internationally for pioneering efforts in the field of sign language interpretation and adult education. She is extensively published on topics that include comparison of simultaneous and consecutive interpreting, team interpreting, advocacy, ethics, mediated education, and interpreting in legal settings. Her current research projects include a demographic survey of ASL-English interpreters in Canada; an examination of the linguistic access that deaf children have when accessing education that is mediated via sign language interpretation; a survey of best practices of interpreters in legal settings; and the documentation of Ukrainian Sign Language in collaboration with the Institute of Special Pedagogy in Kyiv, Ukraine. She is the author of Interpreting in Legal Contexts, published by Linstok Press in their Dissertation Series. Dr. Russell was elected President of the World Association of Sign Language Interpreters in July 2011. She is also a dedicated student of yoga who loves to travel.

Dr. Nanci Scheetz, CSC, Valdosta State University

Nanci A. Scheetz is a Professor at Valdosta State University. She is the Program Coordinator for the undergraduate degree programs in American Sign Language/Interpreting, Deaf Education and Deaf Studies. She also coordinates the graduate program in Deaf Education. Annually she teaches courses in both programs, focusing on interpreting courses and graduate courses in deaf education. She is actively involved in the Georgia Pathways to Language and Literacy Project and continues to work as a freelance interpreter. Dr. Scheetz is the author of several texts and articles, and presents regularly at state, national, and international levels.

Dr. Barbara J. Shaffer, SC:L, CI, CT, University of New Mexico

Barbara Shaffer is an Associate Professor in the Signed Language Interpreting Program at the University of New Mexico. She has a Ph.D. in Educational Linguistics from the University of New Mexico, USA and a Master’s degree in Deaf Education from Gallaudet University in Washington D.C., USA. Her research interests include the development of intersubjective thought in deaf children, and intersubjectivity in interpreted discourse. She recently wrote a chapter entitled "Reported Speech as an Evidentiality Strategy in American Sign Language", which will appear in the volume Viewpoint and Perspective edited by Barbara Dancygier and Eve Sweetser. She also recently co-authored a chapter with Terry Janzen for the volume The Shared Mind entitled “Intersubjectivity in Interpreted Interactions: The Interpreter's Role in Co-constructing Meaning”.

Dr. Linda Stauffer, CSC, OTC, University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Linda Stauffer, has over thirty years experience in education, rehabilitation and interpretation. She is the Coordinator for the Interpreter Education Program at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) and has taught at UALR since 1986. Dr. Stauffer holds a Ph.D. and M.Ed. in Rehabilitation and a B.S. in Deaf Education. She has been a teacher of deaf residential middle school students, a research assistant, an interpreter coordinator, a community interpreter, and a workshop presenter in addition to an interpreter educator.

In addition to published work on visualization and transliteration, Dr. Stauffer co-edited Toward effective practices: A National Dialogue on AA-BA Partnerships (2008, 2010), co-authored Identifying Standards for the Training of Interpreters for Deaf People (1990), and authored LEADERSHIP: Keeping it Alive, Well and Active for the RID Affiliate Chapter Handbook. She has authored interpreter education curricula, and was co editor of the CIT NEWS for 14 years. Dr. Stauffer served on the Board of Directors of RID (1995-2002), the Arkansas chapter of RID (ARID) and the Conference of Interpreter Trainers (CIT) She is the 1992 recipient of the RID/CIT Mary Stotler Award, the UALR College of Education’s Faculty Excellence Award for Public Service (1994) and for Teaching (2010).

Mrs. Myra Taff-Watson, CSC,University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Myra Taff-Watson has 45 years of professional experience in deafness, interpreter education, deaf-blindness, ASL instruction, and interpreting across a wide range of settings and occasions. She is a nationally recognized educator/trainer of interpreters and provided over 260 national, regional and local level inservice workshops on accessibility, ASL, interpreting, conference interpreting, and other special setting interpreting. She retired with Emeritus status and tenure after 25 years with the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) where she served as the former (1982-2004) Program Coordinator of the Interpreter Education Program (UALR-IEP) and faculty member (1982-2006). She was awarded with over $8 million in federal grants to UALR for the education/training of interpreters under five RSA grants (1985-2010) and six OSEP grants (1991-2006). Myra authored/co-authored over 200 articles, chapters, and monographs on deafness and interpreting. She continues to serve on the Editorial Board of the JOI and JADARA, is the Editor of the ARIDian News and Views since 1987 (Arkansas RID) and a former Co-Editor of the CIT News (1987-2001) and is current Chair of three committees for the Arkansas RID chapter. She has served on a variety of federal/national/statewide advisory councils, such as, the RSA National Multi-Cultural Interpreter Training Project and National Training of Interpreters for Individuals who are Deaf-Blind Project, the Arkansas Coalition for the Education of Students who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing and the Arkansas Dept. of Education Committee on Educational Interpreter Standards.

Since July 2006, Myra serves as a Commissioner on the Commission on Collegiate Interpreter Education (CCIE) and is President/CEO of Communication Plus+ Interpreter Services, Inc. and Research Associates, an interpreting service and research company she founded in 1986. Myra is the recipient of numerous university awards such as, the Kappa Delta Pi Scholarship and Leadership Award (2004), the UALR Excellence in Public Service (1989), the UALR College of Education Excellence in Research and Scholarly Activities (1994), the UALR Certificate of Appreciation for Service to School of Engineering Technology (1987). Community awards include the Gloria Wright Award (2005), the City of Little Rock Certificate of Appreciation for Service (1986) and the Arkansas Coalition for the Handicapped Certificate of Appreciation for Service (1985, 1986). For service to RID, CIT and ARID, she is the recipient of the Mary Stotler Award (1994), the RID Silver Scribe Award for Outstanding Newsletter (2001-2003), the RID Outstanding Public Service Award (2001-2003 & 2003-2005) and the ARID Distinguished Service as President (1983-1987). Myra holds the RID CSC (1978) and the M.A. from New York University in Rehabilitation Counseling/Deafness and has completed all her doctoral work. Her professional experience includes working as the communication specialist in deaf-blindness for the Helen Keller National Center, as a certified teacher of the deaf in NYC public schools, and as an interpreter.